Two Secrets to Successfully Marketing Your Book

Author Lynne Watts asks if your ideal buyers know, like and trust you?

Recently, I attended a workshop on LinkedIn about how to use the network effectively. Prior to starting the training the presenter mentioned that in addition to helping clients with marketing, he had also written a children’s book. As someone who has written six (soon to be seven) children’s picture books, I was interested. After thumbing through his book, I asked if he knew about a trendy bookstore down the street that had a children’s section and often had events for emerging authors. He answered that he knew it but that when he approached the owners they weren’t interested in his book because it was self-published. I didn’t tell him that the same bookstore carries my books. They are self-published as well. Want to know my secret?

Don’t Wait Until the Book is Finished to Plan Your Launch

Author Andrew Gilmore Shares Lessons Learned from His Book Launch---and What He'll Do Differently NEXT Time

When I wrote my first book, Do No Work, I knew nothing about marketing. I thought announcing the book on my blog and emailing some friends and family on my list was enough for it to sell.

After I did those things, I expected to relax—champagne glass in one hand, cigar in the other—and watch the sales roll in. Every time I clicked refresh on my sales page the numbers would increase exponentially in some sort of impossible yet glorious parabolic curve.

The Never-Ending Marketing Game

Whether you published with a traditional house or are a self-published author, marketing is an ongoing process.

Creating a multifaceted marketing plan can include participating in contests, getting reviews, doing radio and TV interviews, selling in bulk, speaking to groups, attending book shows, and connecting with people through blogs and online forums. It can be time-consuming and tedious. But without a solid plan and consistent effort, your book is unlikely to get the attention it deserves.