Category Archives for Writing Tips

Do You Have to Be an Expert to Write Your Book?

Not long ago, I was coaching an entrepreneur who wanted to write a book. Every time I inquired about her progress, there was very little to show. She kept procrastinating and simply couldn’t follow through with the writing activities and prompts. She was perfectly clear about the topic she wanted to write about and knew the audience for her book. Her lack of enthusiasm for getting the book done and in print puzzled me.

“What’s really holding you back?” I asked.

“There’s so many books out there by experts. I don’t feel like I’m an expert enough on that topic. Who am I to write this kind of book?”  Continue reading

How Much Should I Pay for a Ghostwriter?

A motivational speaker / business coach recently sent me a great question about ghostwriting. Because there are so many variables (and more than a few scams out there), I wanted to share the question and my response with you, too.

Question

What are upsides & downsides to getting book done with a ghostwriter? [I’m] Getting bids from ghostwriters offering to write 20,000- to 30,000-word books using my speaking and coaching recordings at a cost of $250-$400.

Answer

Ghostwriting is an excellent option for people who simply don’t have time to write or who have a story to tell but don’t have the skill or language background to do it well. That’s the upside.

The downside is that it isn’t inexpensive.

A fee of $250-400 is exceptionally low—barely covering the cost of transcription—even for a short book. That might equate to around $8-15/hour if the writer could knock out 2,000 words an hour. As a professional, would you work for that rate?  Continue reading

Do I Have Anything New to Say?

What can I say that’s new or different from anything that’s already out there?

I hear this question weekly from people who want to write a book and share their stories. They worry that, with all the books, all the blog posts, and all the magazine articles that have already been written, their messages will sound like everyone else’s. Continue reading

What Do You Write about if Life Is Good?

A Twitter follower asked me the above question the other day, and her inquiry sparked a blog post. What do you write about when you haven’t endured some sort of crisis? Is disaster a prerequisite for a good story?

I remember sitting in a conference and getting a little ticked off as I listened to a publishing house editor promote the idea that the best and only way to write is from one’s pain—not discomfort or struggle but tragic, devastating pain. Without that kind of pain, she suggested, it wasn’t possible to be an excellent writer.

Baloney. Continue reading

The 2 Biggest Lies that Hold Writers Back…(Including Me)

CONFESSION. I don’t believe in “writer’s block.” I think this label is nothing more than a convenient excuse for us to delay our writing dreams.

Before you lock me up in the loony bin, let me peel off the mask by pull back the curtain. I wrote 6 traditionally published books, coached over 60 authors on their book projects, and ghostwrote 3 books for high-profile clients.

But I’ve also:

Justified watching movies to “research” for my next book.

Avoided a deadline because unloading the dishwasher seemed more thrilling.

Hit the disc golf course to find inspiration for my next chapter

Wasted more than a few days satisfying a “Platform Building Fix” on Facebook and Twitter.

Bottom line. All these activities seemed noble at the time. And yet, they merely created space between my current state and my calling.

Maybe you can relate? Continue reading

Non-Traditional Advice for Busy or Undisciplined Writers

This is supposed to be an article about how to be a focused and intentional writer. It’s supposed to equip busy people with tools and techniques to fit writing into an already full life.

  • I could tell you to wake up at 5 a.m. and write for an hour. Do it every day, no matter what.
  • I could tell you to write 1,000 words a day before you do anything else.
  • I could tell you to write something even if you don’t know what to write.
  • I could tell you to “write ugly” and clean it up later.

That’s all good advice and it might work, but it’s never worked for me.

I am a broken writer, yet somehow I’ve managed to complete two books. Continue reading

What It Takes to Complete a Book

Sounds so glamorous.  I remember the first time I turned down an invitation to lunch with the words “Oh, I can’t… I’m writing today.”

“Really?” my friend Laurie replied, “what an awesome way to spend the day! I can’t wait to read your book!”

Nodding and smiling, I left her fantasy intact. I knew in my heart a “writing day” wasn’t just creativity flowing but sometimes meant hours of starting at the cursor blinking and trying to string some words together in a semblance of creativity, thought and inspiration. The myriad of other tasks on my to-do list wrestled with my discipline to actually write. It’s a sad state of affairs when cleaning the bathroom looks more enticing than squeezing out another paragraph from a very dry well. Continue reading

3 Ways to Get Your Readers’ Attention

The book was fantastic, but no one was going to read it. Not, at least, in its current state. The author had packed his* manuscript with helpful information and practical advice. The content and his message had real potential to help his audience. But only the most dedicated readers would push past the stale opening line.

Most chapters either dove right into the content with no introduction or started with a statement detailing what the chapter contained. “In this chapter we’re going to learn about….” A line like that makes a great note as you’re planning your writing. In fact, I encourage writers to identify what they’re going to include in each chapter when they outline their books. But when it comes to your hookthe words that will draw readers in and keep their noses in your book—“In this chapter,” isn’t effective; it’s boring.

Other common issues muddied what could have been a great reading experience but, since this is a blog post, let’s stick with one topic at a time. Here are three powerful ways you can get your readers’ attention. Continue reading

Learning to Love the Editing Process

Some people fear public speaking more than death. I guess that makes me the outlier.

I’m a high school Spanish teacher by day. On the weekends and during the summer, I speak at conferences and events. I 3D-DTTwork with teachers to challenge how they think about education and to encourage them to incorporate technology in their classrooms.

I love seeing teachers get excited about new practices that they can use with their students. It means the ideas from my sessions are spreading farther than I could take them myself. The reach of my conference sessions is limited, though. I wanted to spread the ideas that motivate me to as many teachers as possible. So, I sought advice from a fellow teacher and presenter. His suggestion: write a book. Continue reading

1 2 3 4