Category Archives for Writing Tips

How to Stay Focused on Your Writing Goals

When you’re busy, it can be difficult to stay focused on your personal writing projects. Here are a couple of incentives that can help you reach your writing goals.

Life rushes by at an incredible pace.

Do you feel it?

You have great intentions for big accomplishments. But every time you blink, another month has passed, and it feels like you’ve barely made a dent in your writing goals.

(I’m speaking from personal experience here, but I’m betting you might be able to relate.)

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How to Write Faster and Better

Sometimes an idea hits, and there’s no stopping the flow of words. Like a flood, they stream onto the screen with such clarity that your readers can see themselves in your phrases and paragraphs.  

Then there are the times when the cursor blinks back at you, mocking your indecision as you hit backspace again and again. You wish you could write faster and better. (No one has time for writer’s block!) Those moments can be incredibly frustrating. The good news is there’s something you can do to get the words flowing freely.

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3 Ways to Improve Your Writing Skills

In an age of instant expression, you might wonder if there’s a need to improve your writing skills. Social media has proven that everyone can write with very little effort—or thought.

If, however, your goal is to make a difference in others’ lives with your words, it pays to improve your writing skills. Getting the right words in the right order with the right mix of emotion, description, and authenticity that draws readers into your work takes exceptional effort, vulnerability, and intention.

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Indie-Publish Like a Pro — Podcast with the Wealthy Speaker Jane Atkinson

The saying used to be that “those who can’t get published, self-publish.”  With business leaders, like Seth Godin, and fiction titles, like The Shack, proving that self-publishing (aka indie-publishing) can be done well and profitably, that old saying no longer proves true. So what have you got to lose? 

With print-on-demand, anyone can publish a book these days. The trick is doing it in a way that boosts your credibility. On this episode of The Wealthy Speaker Show, speaking coach and podcast host Jane Atkinson and I talk about indie-publishing and using your book as a tool to market yourself and earn more as a speaker.

  • The advantages of indie-publishing.  3:05
  • People do judge a book by its cover.  7:10
  • The most important piece of the puzzle.  9:55
  • Write about what you know and love.  15:50
  • People judge you by your book, so make it great!  20:20
  • Secrets & writing hacks.  26:10
  • Murdering your darling.  33:40
  • When to hire a ghost writer.  36:50

Listen in! And if you have a question about indie-publishing, leave a comment below.

Are you ready to write your book? Get started today with these 7 Simple, Proven Steps.

How to Write & Publish Your First Book

Do you have a book in you? Popular polls indicate that 81% of people say they want to write a book … someday. If you are one of those people, you are clearly in good company! And if you’re a speaker, coach, expert, or leader, a book is a powerful way to build your brand and share your message. But how do you get started? And what do you do when the first draft is complete?

In this podcast interview on The Simply Marketing Show, host and marketing expert Alison Teare  and I discuss some of the most common questions new authors have about writing and publishing.

  • Do you need a publisher?
  • How do you make a start?
  • How do you make money from your book?
  • Is Amazon the best place to publish?
  • Where to write?
  • How much to write?
  • Ways to write when you’re not a natural writer?
  • The difference between traditional publishing and self (indie) publishing

Listen in and add your own question in the comments below.

Are you ready to write your book? Get started today with these 7 Simple, Proven Steps.

 

How to Tell a Great Story

Stories help bring meaning to your message. In this interview with Rory Vaden, we talke about the power of story telling–and how to do it well. We discuss the critical elements that make up a great story and the most common mistakes people make.

Interview Highlights:

• People want authenticity and connection. Stories create that connection. –@ErinKCasey

• If you’re writing, you need to have a hook–something that draws people in. –@ErinKCasey

• To be effective, you have to be relevant. –@ErinKCasey

• Tell an “I” focused story with a “you” focused message. –@Rory_Vaden

 

The Rory Vaden Show

Do You Have to Be an Expert to Write Your Book?

Not long ago, I was coaching an entrepreneur who wanted to write a book. Every time I inquired about her progress, there was very little to show. She kept procrastinating and simply couldn’t follow through with the writing activities and prompts. She was perfectly clear about the topic she wanted to write about and knew the audience for her book. Her lack of enthusiasm for getting the book done and in print puzzled me.

“What’s really holding you back?” I asked.

“There’s so many books out there by experts. I don’t feel like I’m an expert enough on that topic. Who am I to write this kind of book?”  Continue reading

How Much Should I Pay for a Ghostwriter?

A motivational speaker / business coach recently sent me a great question about ghostwriting. Because there are so many variables (and more than a few scams out there), I wanted to share the question and my response with you, too.

Question

What are upsides & downsides to getting book done with a ghostwriter? [I’m] Getting bids from ghostwriters offering to write 20,000- to 30,000-word books using my speaking and coaching recordings at a cost of $250-$400.

Answer

Ghostwriting is an excellent option for people who simply don’t have time to write or who have a story to tell but don’t have the skill or language background to do it well. That’s the upside.

The downside is that it isn’t inexpensive.

A fee of $250-400 is exceptionally low—barely covering the cost of transcription—even for a short book. That might equate to around $8-15/hour if the writer could knock out 2,000 words an hour. As a professional, would you work for that rate?  Continue reading

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