Two Secrets to Successfully Marketing Your Book

Author Lynne Watts asks if your ideal buyers know, like and trust you?

Recently, I attended a workshop on LinkedIn about how to use the network effectively. Prior to starting the training the presenter mentioned that in addition to helping clients with marketing, he had also written a children’s book. As someone who has written six (soon to be seven) children’s picture books, I was interested. After thumbing through his book, I asked if he knew about a trendy bookstore down the street that had a children’s section and often had events for emerging authors. He answered that he knew it but that when he approached the owners they weren’t interested in his book because it was self-published. I didn’t tell him that the same bookstore carries my books. They are self-published as well. Want to know my secret?

Too Much Is Not Enough

Why Book Marketing has to Be a Long-Term Gig

If you have an entrepreneurial spirit, chances are you like change. You like to shake things up. You don’t like to do the same thing over and over and over again. You like variety! And you hate feeling stuck.

books on a shelf - Image courtesy of Kittisak at FreeDigitalPhotos

Those are all excellent traits, but they come with a downside. How do I know? Because I have experienced both the upside and the downside of moving on.

Moving forward in your business can take you to great places. But moving on too quickly may mean that you never really get your message into the hearts and minds of the people you serve. And when it comes to marketing your book, moving on too quickly may mean that you are unintentionally sabotaging your book’s success.

Author Webinar: 3 Ways to Monetize Your Message

webinar - earn more with your messageMaybe you’ve invested a lot of time, energy and money into writing and publishing your book—and you need to recoup your expenses.

Or maybe you’re wondering if you can afford to publish and market a book.

Either way, this webinar is for you! 

Jen McDonough and Erin K. Casey are hosting a webinar Wednesday, May 25 to help you monetize your message and use it to boost your income.

What if you and your book are “not about the money”? Why should you care about earning more when all you really care about is sharing your message and helping people? Consider this: the more you earn, the more people you can help. 

With this webinar, you’ll learn a few effective and legitimate (a.k.a. non-sleazy) ways to monetize your message. And as always, we’ll have the chat room open for questions.

–>Click Here to Reserve Your Spot<–

Space is limited, so go ahead and reserve your spot on the webinar. You’ll receive a recording after the call, so sign up even if you know can’t attend live. BTW, this isn’t a marathon webinar. We get that you’re busy, which is why we’ll keep this session to about 30 minutes.

Just a little background on your hosts:

ErinKCaseyErin K. Casey is an author and ghostwriter of 7 books. She’s a book coach who takes authors (30+ and counting!) through the publishing process—from crafting a powerful message to packaging that message in a beautiful, professionally produced book. Her passion is helping people share their message by creating books that get awesome reviews and build credibility. 

 

Jen McDonough from www.TheIronJen.comJen McDonough is a 4x author who has developed a speaker’s platform that has taken her all across the country. As a resilience coach, she helps people pull the very best out of themselves. One of her passions is helping authors and speakers build platforms so they can effectively share their messages.

 

–>Join us on the webinar!<–

Wednesday, May 25 at 11 a.m CST

See you soon!

What You Need to Know before You Write Your Book

Free / Live Webinar – Tuesday, May 17

Join me and Jen McDonough (a.k.a. The Iron Jen) to learn what you need know before you write your book. Why? Getting started right makes it easier to keep going!

Sign up here –> http://bit.ly/1TzWxAU

What You Need to Know before You Write Your Book

See you soon!

Be on the lookout for stories!

Analogies and allegories are great tools to help bring nonfiction your work to life. Too often, however, the same stories are repeated from book to book.

Break the trend by thinking beyond what you’ve read in a book or heard in a speech from others, and share what you have personally seen, felt or experienced.

Make note of everyday and unusual situations that could serve as illustrations for your message. The highlights and low points of your day can provide you with unique content to help make your book meaningful and original.

Take a moment right now to jot down something that’s happened to you recently and how it might relate to learning a lesson you want to share with others. Don’t have anything to write on? Get the Evernote app for your phone (I use the free version), and it will be waiting for you on your computer when you’re ready to turn those thoughts into a blog post or book chapter.

What did you do or see or hear this weekend that could inspire a story?

Author Q&A with Jen Forsthoff

Sharing Her Story to Help Others

I love all my authors. Truly.  I love that they are brave and generous enough to share their wisdom, experience, passion, knowledge, hopes, and imagination with the world. And each time a client becomes a brand-new author, I feel a little like a proud momma at graduation.

jen forsthoff

Jen Forsthoff makes me especially proud. Aside from being a joy to work with, Jen’s desire to help others is evident in every chapter of her new book, Chosen for Charlie. So imagine my delight when I received a text with a picture of her and sweet little Charlie holding the first copy of their book.

Do I Have Anything New to Say?

How to add to the conversation in a crowded book market.

What can I say that’s new or different from anything that’s already out there?

“If there's a book that you want to read, but it hasn't been written yet, then you must write it.”

I hear this question weekly from people who want to write a book and share their stories. They worry that, with all the books, all the blog posts, and all the magazine articles that have already been written, their messages will sound like everyone else’s.

Tips for Successful Writing Teams

What I Learned from Working on a Collaborative Book Project

Writing is very often a solitary task. We think and write in solitude. We rethink and revise the confines of the booth at the local coffee shop or home office. Alone.

livehappy

That aloneness allows for productivity, banging out words and clarifying thoughts as they turn into words on the screen. But working with others is a unique experience that may help you become an even better writer.

Don’t Wait Until the Book is Finished to Plan Your Launch

Author Andrew Gilmore Shares Lessons Learned from His Book Launch---and What He'll Do Differently NEXT Time

When I wrote my first book, Do No Work, I knew nothing about marketing. I thought announcing the book on my blog and emailing some friends and family on my list was enough for it to sell.

What's Your Launch Plan?

After I did those things, I expected to relax—champagne glass in one hand, cigar in the other—and watch the sales roll in. Every time I clicked refresh on my sales page the numbers would increase exponentially in some sort of impossible yet glorious parabolic curve.

How to Choose a Title for Your Book

Book titles sell books!

Books are judged by their covers. Authors know that. It’s why self-published authors spend weeks or even months—getting their covers just right. A traditionally published author doesn’t always have the freedom to choose and nitpick every detail of his or her cover, but the publishing house’s design and marketing teams likely spend even more time creating a cover that will sell. Colors, images, and font choices are all important, but a great cover begins with a great title. In fact, your book’s title may be even more important than the design you choose for your cover.

Book titles sell