I’ll Put It on the Internet

Joe Calloway explains why being online isn't a marketing strategy.

It’s a phrase I hear almost daily from someone who has an idea for a business: “I’ll put it on the Internet.” I am flabbergasted by the number of seemingly reasonable, intelligent people who think that all they have to do is put their product or service “on the Internet” and then just wait for the money to roll in.

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The opportunity of the Internet is that everyone buying anything goes there, whether it’s in the consumer arena or business to business. The great and almost incomprehensible challenge of the Internet is that everyone is also on there trying to sell something. It is the most crowded market in the universe.

The easy part is getting on the Internet. The hard part is having anyone know that you’re there. Everyone’s gaming the same search machines and using the same key words. It’s easy to be invisible in such a crowded space.

What Do You Write about if Life Is Good?

“I notice that many folks have a disaster in their past. Almost like a requirement these days. What to do if all has been ok?”

A Twitter follower asked me the above question the other day, and her inquiry sparked a blog post. What do you write about when you haven’t endured some sort of crisis? Is disaster a prerequisite for a good story?

I remember sitting in a conference and getting a little ticked off as I listened to a publishing house editor promote the idea that the best and only way to write is from one’s pain—not discomfort or struggle but tragic, devastating pain. Without that kind of pain, she suggested, it wasn’t possible to be an excellent writer.


Five Ways to Recharge after Publishing a Book

You've poured everything into your writing. Now what? Creativity Coach Addie K. Martin has a few suggestions.

Last summer, after submitting the final manuscript for my book, I felt completely drained. While part of me was elated for having completed an eight month labor of love, other parts felt depleted. I poured everything into my book, and then the project was over.


What’s Obvious to You May Be Amazing to Others

2 Minutes of Motivation from Author Derek Sivers


Are you holding back because you think your ideas aren’t unique or good enough? Here’s the thing to remember: What is obvious to you, may be exactly what someone else needs to hear.

If you need help putting your ideas together, check out my 8 Weeks to Authorship course. It outlines the same process I used to ghostwrite a book for a major publishing house this summer. Don’t wait to write your book. The the world needs for you to tell your story and share your message. 

How to Get Over the Fear of Writing and Publishing

“The brave are simply those with the clearest vision of what is before them—glory and danger alike—and, notwithstanding, go out to meet it.”
—Leopold (Hugh Jackman), Kate and Leopold

It takes a certain amount of bravery to be a professional writer or book author. It isn’t the act of writing itself that feels dangerous. You can write in your journal all day and end up feeling refreshed and lighter for having been so honest with yourself. The security of knowing no one will ever read those words liberates your fingers to fly.


Danger isn’t inherent with the penning, but the publishing.

“How do you get over the fear of putting yourself out there?” I’ve lost count of the times clients and fellow writers have asked me this question.

The 3 Most Difficult Steps to Easy Success

“How the heck do you do everything you do?”

ID-100315491I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked that question throughout my life.

Most people expect some simple answer that will fix that part of their life that causes sleepless nights, family fights, the “I wanna puke” feeling and worst of all, shame and emptiness.

Here’s the reality: Success has never been easy. It’s never happened overnight, and, without your best effort every stinkin’ day, it can’t happen!

The 2 Biggest Lies that Hold Writers Back…(Including Me)

CONFESSION. I don’t believe in “writer’s block.” I think this label is nothing more than a convenient excuse for us to delay our writing dreams.

Before you lock me up in the loony bin, let me peel off the mask by pull back the curtain. I wrote 6 traditionally published books, coached over 60 authors on their book projects, and ghostwrote 3 books for high-profile clients.

But I’ve also:

Justified watching movies to “research” for my next book.

Avoided a deadline because unloading the dishwasher seemed more thrilling.

Hit the disc golf course to find inspiration for my next chapter

Wasted more than a few days satisfying a “Platform Building Fix” on Facebook and Twitter.

Bottom line. All these activities seemed noble at the time. And yet, they merely created space between my current state and my calling.

Maybe you can relate?

How to Give a Great Interview

Tim Knox Shares Expert Advice for Being a Podcast Guest

You want the world—or at least your niche—to know about your book, but how do you get the message out? Interviews, particularly radio shows and podcasts, can be an extremely effective medium for spreading the word.


I get that. I know that interviews are important, but they also make me a little nervous. As a writer, I’m generally on the other side of the conversation—the side asking the questions. I want to get better at being interviewed, and I know I’m not alone in that desire. That’s why I asked Tim Knox, host of Interviewing Authors, to share his advice on how to give a great interview.

Non-Traditional Advice for Busy or Undisciplined Writers

James Woosley shares how he wrote a book in just five days.

This is supposed to be an article about how to be a focused and intentional writer. It’s supposed to equip busy people with tools and techniques to fit writing into an already full life.

  • I could tell you to wake up at 5 a.m. and write for an hour. Do it every day, no matter what.
  • I could tell you to write 1,000 words a day before you do anything else.
  • I could tell you to write something even if you don’t know what to write.
  • I could tell you to “write ugly” and clean it up later.

That’s all good advice and it might work, but it’s never worked for me.

I am a broken writer, yet somehow I’ve managed to complete two books.

“How Stories Help You Connect with Readers”
by Rory Vaden & Erin K. Casey

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Today, Rory and Erin Casey talk about the power of telling a story. In this show, they will discuss the critical elements that make up a great story and the most common mistakes people make.